Message books distribution
Print shop Historical overview
The   island   is   divided   in   10   departments.   We   have   set-up   a distribution   committee   that   almost   covers   all   the   churches   in the   island.   There   is   approximately   160   churches   in   Haiti   with about   20   000   believers.   Here   is   the   breakdown   of   the   churches by department. 01- WEST 46 churches 8295 believers 02- NORTH 12 churches 1490 believers 03- NORTH-EAST 03 churches 0345 believers 04- NORTH-WEST 18 churches 3240 believers 05- ARTIBONITE 29 churches 3675 believers 06- SOUTH 18 churches 1490 believers 07- SOUTH-EAST 08 churches 0820 believers 08- GRANDE-ANSE 16 churches 0895 believers 09- NIPPES 02 churches 0130 believers 10- CENTRE 08 churches 0810 believers
I   travelled   to   Haiti   for   the   first   time   in   the   early 1990s   to   accompany   my   pastor   who   had   already   started missionary   work   in   that   country,   a   few   years   prior.   I   was overwhelmed     by     the     extent     of     their     poverty     and, paradoxically,   their   level   of   faith   and   spiritual   riches.   In 1991,    I    became    the    pastor    of    our    local    assembly,    the Assemblée   Lumière   du   Soir   (Evening   Light   Assembly)   in Warden, Quebec, Canada. As   I   like   to   say,   they   stole   my   heart   during   my   very first   trip,   making   me   long   to   go   back.   So   every   year,   we would    prepare    a    series    of    the    most    important    French messages   we   had   on   tapes   to   bring   them   to   the   Haitian assemblies   that   didn’t   have   any.   Once   we   got   there,   we would   purchase   Bibles,   tape   players   and   as   many   batteries   as   would   be   required   for   those   assemblies   to   listen   to the   tapes   for   a   full   year.   Every   year,   we   would   spend   two   weeks   in   Haiti.   Sometimes,   it   would   take   five   or   six   of us    to    bring    these    hundreds    of    tapes    to    about    half    a    dozen    new    assemblies.    We    also    brought    them    French biographies   of   the   prophet.   I   was   able   to   establish   a   Dominican   connection   by   which   we   were   able   to   get   3,333 biographies   printed   in   Dominican   soil   at   a   much   cheaper   rate   than   in   Canada.   This   way,   we   could   distribute   them throughout Haiti without having to carry them over in our luggage. Up   until   2010,   I   traveled   mostly   with   brother   Raymond   Hébert,   pastor   of   the   Madawaska   church,   in   Maine, one   of   the   United   States   of   America.   This   brother   worked   for   a   pulp   and   paper   company,   and   every   year,   they would   donate   a   few   tons   of   photocopying   paper   to   Haiti.   Brother   Raymond   would   ship   this   cargo   a   few   weeks ahead   of   our   planned   trip,   and   then   go   about   distributing   the   paper   to   the   needy   Christian   business   owners, always   saving   some   for   school   children.   One   day,   we   were   in   the   northern   part   of   the   country,   in   St-Michel-de- l’Attalaye,   to   visit   the   assembly   of   Bro.   Napoléon   Borgela,   who   is   also   a   school   principal.   As   we   were   about   to part,   he   begged   us   to   supply   him   with   French   message   books.   I   remember   him   telling   me:   “If   you   give   us   books, God   will   take   care   of   the   rest.”   I   was   so   moved   by   the   fact   that   he   had   put   spiritual   things   first.   Thus   was   born the   idea   of   printing   the   message   in   Haiti.   We   already   had   the   paper,   thanks   to   brother   Hébert,   but   we   were certainly   still   a   long   way   from   our   goal.   Nevertheless,   the   idea   of   printing   the   message   in   Haiti   was   born.   And   as they say: “Once love projects, grace will take over.” In   the   spring   of   2006,   we   held   a   special   meeting   at   Brother   Georges   Lamarre’s.   We   had   gathered   a   group of   about   twenty   pastors,   elders,   trustees,   and   others   from   the   Port-of-Prince   area.   When   we   proposed   the   idea of   printing   the   message   in   Haiti,   the   project   was   greatly   welcomed.   We   therefore   established   a   committee   in charge   of   choosing   the   Message   books   to   be   printed,   and   another   committee   in   charge   of   their   distribution.   A printing   graduate,   Brother   Wilfrid   St-Fort,   gave   me   a   printing   shop   tour,   so   that   I   could   get   familiarized   with   the printing    equipment    we    would    need    to    acquire.    Brother    Lamarre    offered    us,    free    of    charge,    a    space    in    the Bourbon   district   of   Port-of-Prince   that   we   occupied   till   the   2010   earthquake.   During   that   massive   quake,   the entire   four-story   building   collapsed,   but   by   the   grace   of   God,   the   basement   that   contained   all   our   equipment weathered the shock, and the equipment was only subjected to superficial damages. Having   no   other   available   space   to   set   up   our   print   shop,   we   had   to   store   the   salvaged   equipment   in   a warehouse,   until   my   May   2012   trip   back   to   Haiti.   Before   leaving,   I   asked   my   local   assembly   to   pray   that   God would   provide   for   an   air-conditioned   space   in   order   to   fight   off   every   printer’s   worst   enemy,   humidity,   and   that   it would   also   have   closed   windows   to   ward   off   enemy   number   two,   dust.   Toward   the   end   of   one   afternoon,   I walked   back   from   visiting   a   very   needy   brother   in   order   to   give   him   the   funds   he   needed   to   buy   a   tarpaulin   to cover   the   improvised   shelter   he   and   his   wife   and   three   young   children   had   been   living   in   since   the   quake.   As   I was   walking   past   an   ice   and   filtered   water   plant,   I   heard   someone   hailing   me.   I   recognized   the   voice   to   be   that of   Brother   Fénol   François’,   but   I   didn’t   know   he   was   actually   the   owner   of   that   plant.   Sitting   behind   the   wheel   of his   pickup   truck,   he   was   calling   out:   “Brother   Petit,   what   are   you   doing   here,   and   where   are   you   going?”   As   he offered   to   drive   me   to   the   place   I   was   staying   at,   I   squeezed   in   at   the   back,   with   the   group   of   workers   he   was driving   back   home.   Dropping   me   off   at   my   destination,   he   said;   “I   didn’t   know   anything   about   your   arrival.” When   I   told   him   that   I   had   mainly   come   to   find   a   new   location   to   set   the   printing   shop   back   up,   so   that   we   could continue   printing   the   Message   again,   he   immediately   said:   “Brother   Petit,   your   search   is   over,   I   have   what   you need   for   this   endeavor,   and   it   is   free.”      The   next   morning,   I   went   to   visit   the   space   he   had   to   offer,   on   the second   floor   and   at   the   front   part   of   his   ice   and   water   plant.   It   was   a   beautiful   unused   commercial   space   with   a new    air-conditioning    unit,    and    closed    windows.    Clearly,    it    was    an    answer    from    God!    A    few    days    later,    we transferred   the   printing   equipment   to   our   new   premises.   And   this   is   where,   to   this   day,   the   French   Message books   are   being   printed   in   Haiti   again.   And   since   Brother   Fénol   produces   his   own   electricity,   the   constant   power cuts that used to hinder the printing work are now a thing of the past.
Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit? James 2, 16
Printing & Distribution
Check
français bientôt disponible
The   island   is   divided   in   10   departments.   We   have set-up   a   distribution   committee   that   almost   covers   all the   churches   in   the   island. There   is   approximately   160 churches   in   Haiti   with   about   20   000   believers.   Here   is the breakdown of the churches by department. 01- WEAT 46 churches 8295 believers 02- NORTH 12 churches 1490 believers 03- NORTH-EAST 03 churches 0345 believers 04- NORTH-WEST 18 churches 3240 believers 05- ARTIBONITE 29 churches 3675 believers 06- SOUTH 18 churches 1490 believers 07- SOUTH-EAST 08 churches 0820 believers 08- GRANDE-ANSE 16 churches 0895 believers 09- NIPPES 02 churches 0130 believers 10- CENTRE 08 churches 0810 believers
Print shop Historical overview
français bientôt disponible
Printing and distribution
I      travelled to     Haiti     for     the first     time     in     the early       1990s       to accompany          my pastor      who      had already         started missionary   work   in that   country,   a   few years    prior.    I    was overwhelmed       by the   extent   of   their   poverty   and,   paradoxically,   their   level   of   faith and   spiritual   riches.   In   1991,   I   became   the   pastor   of   our   local assembly,     the     Assemblée     Lumière     du     Soir     (Evening     Light Assembly) in Warden, Quebec, Canada. As   I   like   to   say,   they   stole   my   heart   during   my   very   first trip,    making    me    long    to    go    back.    So    every    year,    we    would prepare   a   series   of   the   most   important   French   messages   we   had on   tapes   to   bring   them   to   the   Haitian   assemblies   that   didn’t   have any.   Once   we   got   there,   we   would   purchase   Bibles,   tape   players and   as   many   batteries   as   would   be   required   for   those   assemblies to   listen   to   the   tapes   for   a   full   year.   Every   year,   we   would   spend two   weeks   in   Haiti.   Sometimes,   it   would   take   five   or   six   of   us   to bring    these    hundreds    of    tapes    to    about    half    a    dozen    new assemblies.    We    also    brought    them    French    biographies    of    the prophet.    I    was    able    to    establish    a    Dominican    connection    by which     we     were     able     to     get     3,333     biographies     printed     in Dominican   soil   at   a   much   cheaper   rate   than   in   Canada.   This   way, we    could    distribute    them    throughout    Haiti    without    having    to carry them over in our luggage. Up    until    2010,    I    traveled    mostly    with    brother    Raymond Hébert,   pastor   of   the   Madawaska   church,   in   Maine,   one   of   the United   States   of   America.   This   brother   worked   for   a   pulp   and paper   company,   and   every   year,   they   would   donate   a   few   tons   of photocopying   paper   to   Haiti.   Brother   Raymond   would   ship   this cargo   a   few   weeks   ahead   of   our   planned   trip,   and   then   go   about distributing   the   paper   to   the   needy   Christian   business   owners, always   saving   some   for   school   children.   One   day,   we   were   in   the northern   part   of   the   country,   in   St-Michel-de-l’Attalaye,   to   visit the   assembly   of   Bro.   Napoléon   Bougella,   who   is   also   a   school principal.   As   we   were   about   to   part,   he   begged   us   to   supply   him with   French   message   books.   I   remember   him   telling   me:   “If   you give   us   books,   God   will   take   care   of   the   rest.”   I   was   so   moved   by the   fact   that   he   had   put   spiritual   things   first.   Thus   was   born   the idea   of   printing   the   message   in   Haiti.   We   already   had   the   paper, thanks   to   brother   Hébert,   but   we   were   certainly   still   a   long   way from   our   goal.   Nevertheless,   the   idea   of   printing   the   message   in Haiti   was   born.   And   as   they   say:   “Once   love   projects,   grace   will take over.” In    the    spring    of    2006,    we    held    a    special    meeting    at Brother   Georges   Lamarre’s.   We   had   gathered   a   group   of   about twenty    pastors,    elders,    trustees,    and    others    from    the    Port-of- Prince   area.   When   we   proposed   the   idea   of   printing   the   message in     Haiti,     the     project     was     greatly     welcomed.     We     therefore established    a    committee    in    charge    of    choosing    the    Message books   to   be   printed,   and   another   committee   in   charge   of   their distribution.    A    printing    graduate,    Brother    Wilfrid    St-Fort,    gave me   a   printing   shop   tour,   so   that   I   could   get   familiarized   with   the printing   equipment   we   would   need   to   acquire.   Brother   Lamarre offered   us,   free   of   charge,   a   space   in   the   Bourbon   district   of Port-of-Prince   that   we   occupied   till   the   2010   earthquake.   During that   massive   quake,   the   entire   four-story   building   collapsed,   but by    the    grace    of    God,    the    basement    that    contained    all    our equipment    weathered    the    shock,    and    the    equipment    was    only subjected to superficial damages. Having   no   other   available   space   to   set   up   our   print   shop, we   had   to   store   the   salvaged   equipment   in   a   warehouse,   until my   May   2012   trip   back   to   Haiti.   Before   leaving,   I   asked   my   local assembly   to   pray   that   God   would   provide   for   an   air-conditioned space   in   order   to   fight   off   every   printer’s   worst   enemy,   humidity, and   that   it   would   also   have   closed   windows   to   ward   off   enemy number   two,   dust.   Toward   the   end   of   one   afternoon,   I   walked back   from   visiting   a   very   needy   brother   in   order   to   give   him   the funds    he    needed    to    buy    a    tarpaulin    to    cover    the    improvised shelter   he   and   his   wife   and   three   young   children   had   been   living in   since   the   quake.   As   I   was   walking   past   an   ice   and   filtered water   plant,   I   heard   someone   hailing   me.   I   recognized   the   voice to   be   that   of   Brother   Fénol   François’,   but   I   didn’t   know   he   was actually   the   owner   of   that   plant.   Sitting   behind   the   wheel   of   his pickup   truck,   he   was   calling   out:   “Brother   Petit,   what   are   you doing   here,   and   where   are   you   going?”   As   he   offered   to   drive   me to   the   place   I   was   staying   at,   I   squeezed   in   at   the   back,   with   the group   of   workers   he   was   driving   back   home.   Dropping   me   off   at my    destination,    he    said;    “I    didn’t    know    anything    about    your arrival.”   When   I   told   him   that   I   had   mainly   come   to   find   a   new location    to    set    the    printing    shop    back    up,    so    that    we    could continue    printing    the    Message    again,    he    immediately    said: “Brother   Petit,   your   search   is   over,   I   have   what   you   need   for   this endeavor,   and   it   is   free.”      The   next   morning,   I   went   to   visit   the space   he   had   to   offer,   on   the   second   floor   and   at   the   front   part of   his   ice   and   water   plant.   It   was   a   beautiful   unused   commercial space    with    a    new    air-conditioning    unit,    and    closed    windows. Clearly,    it    was    an    answer    from    God!    A    few    days    later,    we transferred   the   printing   equipment   to   our   new   premises.   And   this is    where,    to    this    day,    the    French    Message    books    are    being printed   in   Haiti   again.   And   since   Brother   Fénol   produces   his   own electricity,    the    constant    power    cuts    that    used    to    hinder    the printing work are now a thing of the past.